Seven fundamental axioms of my leg lock system

Leg lock

Nowadays most people are willing to admit that the new approach to leg locking that I teach and which was so brilliantly exhibited by my students, is a highly effective addition to the jiu jitsu arsenal that I am confident will make jiu jitsu even more effective as a martial art that prides itself upon its ability to defeat opponents by submission. It can be very instructive to ask - what did we do differently? Why did it suddenly happen that a group of people were able to do so well with techniques that were considered low percentage for generations? My approach is built around some core insights that motivate and give substance to the system overall.

1 My approach to leg locking is HOLISTIC. The effectiveness of a leg lock will be proportional to the system of set ups and follow ups and a vast array of tactics and techniques in between. Teaching leg locks as MOVES was largely ineffective for generations. Teaching them as a SYSTEM around a move was extremely effective.

2 I strongly distinguish between the means of CONTROL (ashi garami) and SUBMISSION (the actual lock employed eg heel hook)

3 Doing so encourages the use of MULTIPLE ASHI GARAMI PER LOCK so that the different respective tasks of each heel hook can be covered by a different ashi garami well suited to that task.

4 The direction of force of the ashi garami must DIRECTLY OPPOSE the direction of force of the lock so as to immobilize the opponent and create ideal breaking conditions

5 The break must involve opposing forces BOTH UPON THE KNEE THROUGH THE ASHI GARAMI (against the direction of the lock) AND THE FOOT (through the grip you employ to create a simultaneous push/pull)

6 I also seek to control BOTH LEGS whenever possible. By distinguishing between a PRIMARY leg to be attacked and a SECONDARY leg to be controlled, athletes can immobilize opponents and attack at their own pace.

7 I strongly emphasized BOTTOM POSITION ENTRIES (usually from butterfly, X and half guard) over traditional top position entries so that POSITIONAL LOSS was never an issue for my students. All they had to do was establish grips and inside position on bottom and attack